THE KEIO MEDICAL SCIENCE PRIZE
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Tony Hunter

The 2001 Keio Medical Science Prize Awardees

Tony Hunter

Professor, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Adjunct Professor, University of California, San Diego

Reason for Selection and his Major Achievement:

Theme:Identification of Src tyrosine kinase and functional study of cell growth and tumorgenesis

In 1980, Dr. Tony Hunter became the first to identify Src tyrosine kinase and its relevance in tumorgenesis. His work stimulated all of the subsequent studies on this topic, which led to the identification of many tyrosine kinases and phosphatases and their fundamental role in cellular signal transduction and growth control. Since his discovery of tyrosine kinase, Dr. Hunter has focused on learning more about the physiology of the protein-tyrosine phosphorylation triggered by Src kinase and how their perturbations result in tumorgenesis. Dr. Hunter has been awarded for his fundamental contribution to our molecular understanding of the control of cell growth.

Education

1965

University of Cambridge, England, B.A. (First Class Honours)

1966

University of Cambridge, M.A.

1969

University of Cambridge, Ph.D.

Academic Positions

1968-1971

Research Fellow, Christ's College, University of Cambridge

1971-1973

Research Associate, The Salk Institute, La Jolla

1973-1975

Research Fellow, Christ's College, University of Cambridge

1975-1978

Assistant Professor, The Salk Institute

1978-1982

Associate Professor, The Salk Institute

1979-1983

Adjunct Associate Professor, University of California, San Diego

1983-

Adjunct Professor, University of California, San Diego

1982-

>Professor, The Salk Institute

Masatoshi Takeichi

Winners of the Keio Medical Science Prize 2001

Masatoshi Takeichi

Professor, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology
Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University
Director, RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology

Reason for Selection and his Major Achievement:

Theme: The discovery of cadherin and studies on the molecular mechanisms of cell-cell adhesion

Dr. Masatoshi Takeichi was responsible for determining that two distinct mechanisms, one calcium-dependent and the other calcium-independent, are involved in the process of cell-cell adhesion. He identified and named the first "cadherin", protein and latter described a major molecular family of cadherins, inclucing E-, N- and P-cadherin. These proleins are involved in the mediation of calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion. Dr. Takeichi also demonstrated that each type of cadherin is differentially expressed in different tissues and contributes to selective cellular adhesiveness through homophilic interactions. Consequently, Dr. Takeichi has made an enormous contribution to our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell-cell adhesion. Studies on the cadherin-superfamily, pioneered by Dr. Takeichi, have had great impact on fields as diverse as developmental biology, cell biology, oncology, immunology and neuroscience.

Education

1966

B.Sc. in Biology, Nagoya University

1973

Ph.D. in Biophysics, Kyoto University

1974-76

Research Fellow, Carnegie Institution,
Department of Embryology, with Dr. Richard Pagano

Academic Positions

1970-1977

Assistant Professor, Department of Biophysics,
Faculty of Science, Kyoto University

1978-1985

Associate Professor, Department of Biophysics,
Kyoto University

1985-1998

Professor, Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University

1992-1997

Visiting Professor, National Institute for Basic Biology

1993

Visiting Professor of Pathology, Harvard University

1993-1998

Head, Center for Molecular and Developmental Biology,
Faculty of Science, Kyoto University

1999-

Professor, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology,
Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University

2000-

Director, RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology

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