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Steven A. Rosenberg

The 2012 Keio Medical Science Prize Awardees

Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D.

Chief of Surgery, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
* Website (National Cancer Institute)

Reason for Selection and His Major Achievement:

Development of Effective Immunotherapies for Patients with Cancer

Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg has pioneered the development of innovative immunotherapies for patients with cancer. Dr. Rosenberg was the first to develop an effective immunotherapy for human cancer by showing that stimulation of the human immune system with interleukin-2 could cause durable regressions in patients with metastatic melanoma and kidney cancer. He identified human anti-tumor lymphocytes and used them to characterize dozens of human tumor antigens that have been widely used in the study of cancer vaccines. Dr. Rosenberg developed a new approach to treating cancer using the adoptive transfer of anti-tumor T cells that could lead to durable, complete cancer regressions. His recent work using genetic engineering to develop anti-tumor immune lymphocytes by inserting genes that encoded antigen specific T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors was the first to successfully treat patients with advanced metastatic melanomas, sarcomas and lymphomas refractory to standard therapies. Thus, Dr. Rosenberg has made outstanding contributions both in the fields of basic tumor immunology as well as cancer immunotherapy.

Background

1957-1961

B.A. (with general honors) The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland

1961-1964

M.D. The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

1964-1968

Ph.D. in Biophysics, Harvard University, Cambridge,Massachusetts
(Thesis: The Proteins of Erythrocyte Membranes)

1963-1964

Internship, in Surgery, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts

1964-1968

Graduate Student, Department of Biophysics, Harvard University

1968-1969

Resident, in Surgery, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts

1969-1970

Research Fellow in Immunology (with Dr. John David), Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

1970-1972

Clinical Associate, Immunology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

1972-1974

Resident, in Surgery, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts

1974-Present

Chief of Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

1979-Present

Professor of Surgery, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD

1988-Present

Professor of Surgery - George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, D.C.

Major Honors and Awards

2011

William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Basic and Tumor Immunology, Cancer Research Institute

2006-2007

Sergio Lombroso Award in Cancer Research, Weizmann Institute of Science

2006

American Surgical Association Medallion for Scientific Achievement

1991

Karnofsky Prize, American Society of Clinical Oncology

1996

The John Wayne Award for Clinical Research, Society of Surgical Oncology

Hiroyuki Mano, M.D., Ph.D.

The 2012 Keio Medical Science Prize Awardees

Hiroyuki Mano, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Jichi Medical University
Project Professor, The University of Tokyo

Reason for Selection and His Major Achievement:

Discovery of a lung cancer oncogene EML4-ALK and development of molecular targeted therapy

Dr. Hiroyuki Mano identified an EML4-ALK fusion gene from human lung cancer by using a retroviral functional cDNA cloning method, and demonstrated, by generating transgenic mice with the fusion gene, that the fusion gene can cause lung cancer, and also that ALK inhibitors suppress the tumor growth in the mice. These findings indicate that fusion genes generated by chromosomal translocations may also be important as oncogenes and serve as major drivers of the development of solid cancers in addition to hematological malignancies, for whose genesis this mechanism has been known to be important. Dr. Mano also developed the EML4-ALK diagnostic method and established a consortium for the diagnosis of patients, which led to demonstration of the strong anti-tumor effects of ALK inhibitors in a clinical trial. Dr. Mano has also reported on the mechanisms of development of drug resistance and novel fusion genes causing lung cancer. Therefore, Dr. Mano, through translational research, has made outstanding contributions to the advancement in our understanding of cancer biology and to the development of a novel cancer therapy.

Background

1984

Graduated from School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo

1984-1986

Resident in Internal Medicine, The Tokyo University Hospital

1986-1989

Clinical Fellow, The Third Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo

1989-1991

Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Biochemistry, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, USA

1991-1993

Assistant Professor, The Third Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo

1993-2001

Associate Professor, Division of Functional Genomics, Jichi Medical University

2001-present

Professor, Division of Functional Genomics, Jichi Medical University

2009-present

Project Professor, Department of Medical Genomics, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo

Major Honors and Awards

2008

Medical Award of The Japan Medical Association

2010

The Takeda Medical Prize

2010

Uehara Award

2011

Takamine Memorial Daiichi Sankyo Prize

2011

The Commendation for Science and Technology by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology

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